CAAM 2015 Documentary Fund Awards

A Guangzhou Love Story
A Guangzhou Love Story

For 35 years, the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM) has supported independent filmmakers producing stories by or about Asian Americans for public broadcast and public media. To date, CAAM has awarded nearly $5 million to over 300 projects that illuminate the Asian and Asian American experience.

CAAM is proud to announce the selected 2015 CAAM Documentary Fund Awards.

Funding is made possible with support from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. The Documentary Fund Awards is run by the Media Fund department at CAAM. The following (in alphabetical order) are films selected from the open call in 2015:

A Guangzhou Love Story by Kathy Huang (director) and Debbie Lum (producer)
In China, an unprecedented surge in African migration has led to a rise in marriages between Chinese women and African men. A Guangzhou Love Story captures the love, heartache, and real life challenges of Afro-Chinese couples attempting to forge a future together in the face of racism and xenophobic policies.
Frank Wong's Chinatown

Frank Wong’s Chinatown (working title)

Frank Wong’s Chinatown (working title) by James Q. Chan (director/producer) and Corey Tong (producer)
A story of 81-year-old San Francisco artist Frank Wong who has spent the past four decades recreating his fading memories by building romantic, extraordinarily detailed miniature models of the Chinatown neighborhood shops, streets, and intimate family rooms of his youth. This film takes the journey of one individual and maps it to a rapidly changing neighborhood, San Francisco Chinatown, beginning in the 1940s to the present. A meditation on history, community, memory and preserving one’s own legacy, Frank Wong’s art—his seven, three-dimensional miniature dioramas—serve as portals to the past and becomes an ‘insider’s guide’ through a community intimately interwoven with the history of the city.

Resistance at Tule Lake

Resistance at Tule Lake

Resistance at Tule Lake by Konrad Aderer (director and producer) and Michelle Chen (co-producer)
Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War Two have often been mythologized as a “model minority” who passively submitted to mass confinement in concentration camps. This new documentary brings to life the story of Tule Lake Segregation Center, which destroys that myth. In this highly militarized camp created for 12,000 individuals the government branded as “disloyals” and “troublemakers,” Japanese Americans openly defied the racist incarceration regime, asserting their democratic rights in the face of escalating state violence and repression.
Who is Arthur Chu?

Who is Arthur Chu?

Who is Arthur Chu? by Yu Gu (director and producer) and Scott Drucker (director and producer)
Who is Arthur Chu? is a feature-length documentary following the controversial 11-time Jeopardy! winner, Arthur Chu, as he attempts to leverage his online notoriety to take on social justice issues. While tackling racism and misogyny in nerd culture across the far reaches of the internet, Arthur also works toward a personal journey of redemption.