The National Minority Consortia is now the National Multicultural Alliance

An image with swirling colors on the perimeter and the words "National Multicultural Alliance" in the middle.
The National Multicultural Alliance announced new name (formerly the National Minority Consortia).
"The National Multicultural Alliance represents a decades-long collaboration of nonprofit media organizations that share a commitment to diversity in public media," said CAAM Executive Director Stephen Gong. "We look forward to continuing to this work for decades to come."

The National Minority Consortia is now the National Multicultural Alliance. The official announcement was given by Shirley K. Sneve (Rosebud Sioux), Executive Director of Vision Maker Media, at the 2019 PBS Annual Meeting.

“The National Minority Consortia is dedicated to bringing unique voices and perspectives from diverse communities to all aspects of public broadcasting,” Sneve said. “For over forty years the NMC has been crucial to public broadcasting’s mission and we will continue our amazing work with public media but now as the NMC Alliance – I’m pleased to announce that we are now National Multicultural Alliance.”

Sneve represented her colleagues Stephen Gong, at the Center for Asian American Media; Leslie Fields-Cruz, from Black Public Media; Leanne Ferrer, at Pacific Islanders in Communications; and Sandie Vasquez Pedlow, at Latino Public Broadcasting.

“The National Multicultural Alliance represents a decades-long collaboration of nonprofit media organizations that share a commitment to diversity in public media,” said CAAM Executive Director Stephen Gong. “We look forward to continuing to this work for decades to come.”

The following NMCA program were highlighted at the 2019 PBS Annual Meeting:

LPB presents EL PORVENIR, Texas. Revisit the tragic events along the Texas border between 1910–1920, a time of sustained racial violence in American history, culminating in the fraught and divisive issues of the border today.

VMM and American Masters presents N. SCOTT MOMADAY: WORDS FROM A BEAR. The only Native American to win the Pultizer Prize—the Kiowa artist tells his unique American experience.

BPM presents DECADE OF FIRE, In the 1970s, the Bronx was on fire. Now, Bronx-born Vivian Vázquez Irizarry exposes the truth about the borough’s untold history and reveals how her community chose to resist, remain, and rebuild.

JADDOLAND from CAAM, explores the meaning of home—for a family from Iraq—now living in the Texas panhandle through art and history.

EATING UP EASTER from PIC looks at the effects of tourism on the isolated Pacific Easter Island, revealing the complexities of development and the contradictions within us all as we are faced with hard choices about our planet’s future.

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